Juana Adcock – Connecting Scotland and Mexico

We explore the work of Juana Adcock, one of the Literary Europe Live’s New Voices from Europe. Her practise is firmly balanced between translation and writing poetry, often exploring the relationship between the two.

Posted by Luka Ostojic on 18 August 2016 Literary Europe Live, Literature Across Frontiers


Juana Adcock is a poet and translator working in English and Spanish, born in Mexico in 1982.

Her first book, Manca, explores the anatomy of violence in Mexico and was named by Reforma‘s distinguished critic Sergio González Rodríguez as one of the best poetry books published in 2014.

In 2015, she guest-edited and translated all the poems for an issue of UNAM’s Punto de partida on contemporary British poetry. In the same year, her volume of translations into Spanish of award-winning Scottish poet Alexander Hutchison‘s work was published in Mexico, entitled Gavia Stellata.

Juana is a poet and translator, born and raised in Mexico and based in Scotland for a number of years now. She represents so much of what is great about modern Scotland; new voices from diverse backgrounds making language their own, unafraid to experiment and innovate.

Her practise is firmly balanced between translation and creative writing, and her poems and workshops often explore the relationship between the two. Her strong ongoing links with Mexico mean that she also brings to UK voices which might otherwise be difficult to hear in English.

Her poems and translations have appeared in publications such as Magma Poetry, Shearsman, Structo, Gutter, Glasgow Review of Books, Asymptote and Words Without Borders, as well as several anthologies.

She is currently apprenticed to the Scottish poet Liz Lochhead as part of the Clydebuilt poetry apprenticeship scheme.

New Voices from Europe

Juana Adcock has been selected as one of the New Voices from Europe, ten of the most interesting writers working in Europe today. The New Voices from Europe selection is part of the Literary Europe Live project which is co-ordinated by Literature Across Frontiers and co-funded by the Creative Europe Programme of the European Union, with support from Arts Council Wales.